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My Family Moves to Florida

My dad’s birthday was yesterday. He was James White Miller V and was born July 10, 1932 in Kissimmee, Florida. He liked to tell people he was from Kiss-a-me, and then he’d pucker up. He died in 1989 and thinking about him this week inspired this post about my Florida ancestors.

In 1842 the US Congress enacted the Armed Occupation Act with the purpose of populating and protecting the eastern shore of the Florida peninsula. It was like the Homestead Act that settled the plains that we learned about in U. S. history. Someone occupies and defends 160 acres of land, builds a dwelling, cultivates the land and after five years they own the land free and clear. The act was only in effect nine months and less than 1,200 permits were granted. As far as I can tell no one in my family took advantage of it but it was part of the process that encouraged settlement in Florida.

Ask me about Oklahoma history and I can rattle off all kinds of facts and figures and trivia, but Florida not so much. My dad was born there, so I know a little as it pertained to his life, but not much about the really olden days. Turns out bunches of the early pioneers to Florida came from Georgia, which makes sense, since it’s the closest state. Some of my ancestors were in that mass of Georgians who moved south.

My grandmother Kathryn McKay was born in Illinois in 1905 and her family moved to Florida just after 1910—as near as I can figure—but my Miller and Bass great grandparents came much earlier. The Millers came from York County, South Carolina between 1870 and 1875. Census records show they were quite the land holders (and slave owners) in Lancaster County, South Carolina for decades leading up to the Civil War. One of my ancestors, Stephen Miller—born in 1740—died at Belaire, Lancaster, South Carolina. I can’t find any town or city by that name, but when I googled it, the name Belair turned up a lot in the Lancaster area. I wonder if Bellaire was the name of their plantation. A few generations later, census records suggest the Millers lost the family home during or after the war. In the 1870 census, six years after the war ended, the James Miller family was counted at Ft. Mill, South Carolina in York County. And five years later, in 1875, my great great grandpa, James Miller, died and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery in Kissimmee, Florida. He was just 51. His son, James White Miller II would marry Honoria Quary Mills and become an early sheriff of Osceola County.

As to my other Florida great grandparents Quinn Bass married Jane Richards in Sumter, Georgia in 1845.Their son William, the first of 13 kids (I think), was born in Florida in 1848 according to the 1860 US Census.That year the family was counted in Brevard County which had a total population of 246. U.S. Census records show Quinn and Jane were counted in Brevard County in 1860, Orange County in 1870, and in Osceola County in 1900. At first I wondered why they moved around so much during those years. They were living on the frontier so new arrivals had to build a house from scratch—probably a log cabin—to live in. It was not an easy thing to “move” unless there was a very good reason for it so I started doing some digging.

I’ve found a wonderful website, part of the Newberry Library in Chicago that has an Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. I use that page frequently. There is a map of the United States and after you click on one of the states you’ll get a state map and when you click on “View Interactive Map” you’ll get a map of the state with the date the territory was established and counties in place at the time. You can change the date to show how the counties changed through the years. Here’s what Florida looked like in 1825.

Did you know most of the east coast of Florida was part of Mosquito County? As accurate as that is, it’s probably a good idea they dropped the name as more counties were created.

Anyway.

As I clicked through the years and looked at the county boundaries I found there is a little sliver at the top of present day Osceola County—a sliver that includes Kissimmee—that was first part of Brevard County, then part of Orange County, and finally ended up in Osceola County. I tend to think Quinn and Jane Bass set up housekeeping somewhere along that sliver in the vicinity of Kissimmee and the future St. Cloud and were in the same general area all those years. In 1867 their daughter Effie, my great-grandmother, was born there.

Effie Bass married James White Miller II in 1885 when she was 18 years old. They had three children, Corrie Elizabeth (Aunt Corrie to my dad), James White III (my grandpa) and Honora Jane, who died when she was two years old. The baby was named after her two grandmothers: Honoria Quary Mills Miller and Jane Richards Bass. She died in 1899 and so far I haven’t found anything that tells me why or how she died. Five years later, in 1904, Effie died at the age of 37.I don’t know how she died either.

Sheriff Miller married again, to Marion Miller Butler (yes, her maiden name was Miller), who was born in Vicksburg in 1863 in the midst of the Civil War. Union soldiers quartered at her house during the war and called her “Little Reb.” In fact, her middle name was Rebella. Grandma Miller, as we would know her, lived to the ripe old age of 101. She received a birthday card from President Kennedy when she turned 100. He would be assassinated later that same year.

The McKays were the last of my grandparents to arrive in Florida coming shortly after 1910. After the previous generation settled Whiteside County, Illinois, Donald Graham McKay (his father was born in Nova Scotia) decided to take his family to Florida. He was anticipating, and hoping to take advantage of, the land boom which continued into the 1920s.

The McKays were the first of my ancestors to arrive in Florida by car, traveling from Illinois in a Model T. My brother remembers hearing they had to spend some time in Georgia (Atlanta or Macon I think) to have the axles rebuilt to fit the ruts that formed the roads in the south. Evidently the width of a bale of cotton and the wagon that carried it dictated the width of the ruts of roads in the south. I don’t know what determined the width of roads in the north, but it wasn’t a cotton wagon.

In the 1930 the kids were all grown, and Donald and Olive McKay lived on Poinsettia Avenue in Orlando. Their home was valued at $20,000 on the 1930 census, easily the most affluent home in the area. They lived just around the corner from their daughter Gertrude and her family. Robert Dyer, his wife—we called her Aunt Gertie—and their five kids lived around the corner on Sheridan Avenue. The house on Sheridan was always our first stop when Dad took us home to Florida for vacations.

So that’s how my family got to Florida. They started arriving in the 1840s and my dad left when he joined the Air Force after he graduated from Orlando High School in 1949. He met my mom while he was in the service. That is a story—totally romantic—for another day.

Do you know how your family got to where they are now? I’d love to hear your stories.

Jan

xo to you Dad! :-)

 
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Posted by on July 11, 2014 in McKay, Miller

 

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What’s Your Name?

So yesterday I posted a bit about the Lard/Laird branch of my family tree and coincidentally today the Genealogy Tip of the Day was about last names.  How fixed are they?  Turns out not very.

In certain regions of Europe last names changed from one generation to another or were tied to the property on which an ancestor lived…

Learn about your ancestor’s country of origin and determine what the common practices were in that region…

Even before I started researching my family tree I’d heard names sometimes changed from the old country to the new world. Different languages, different accents, unknown spellings all played a part in the names new Americans acquired upon arrival. The name Vito Corleone is recognized as the main character in the Godfather. However, in the Godfather II it’s a young Vito Andolini who arrives at Ellis Island from Corleone, Sicily. As the boy is registered to enter the United States there are language difficulties and Vito is given the last name Corleone, which is actually the name of his home town.

However, It also seems to have happened to our names as we moved from state to territory to new frontier areas as we settled the country. My research into my great-grandmother Bessie Jane Belew Rose turns up relatives and ancestors named Belue, Beleu, Ballew and even Ballou, as in Cat Ballou. Remember that movie with Lee Marvin playing the drunkest gunfighter in the west? Cat—as in Catherine—Ballou hires him to protect the family ranch and then avenge her father’s death. It was a comedy by the way, made in 1965. But back to our story… The name is pronounced “blue” like the color, and that’s how it’s spelled in some families along with a very French version of Ballieux, or something like that.

Turns out I have a branch of Blues, like the color, on a different part of my tree. And a great great grandmother, Catherine Blue—I wonder if she was called Cat. These Blues came from Scotland by way of Nova Scotia and as far as I can tell the name was always spelled Blue. This is the same family that begat Ronald Reagan and makes the former president one of our distant cousins on my Dad’s side.

Speaking of French—back to the Ballieux spelling—Phillippe Du Trieux arrived in New Amsterdam in 1624 with the first immigrants on the ship the New Netherland to settle on Manhattan Island. In a few generations Philippe, became Phillip, and du Trieux became Truax. One of the du Trieux boys married Sarah la Roux, They named a son Larue, and his last name became Truex, with an “e” and then later the name settled on the spelling of Truax, with an “a”. About the same time someone named VanderVinck arrived in the area and over a couple of generations his name evolved to become Wink, as in Sansom Wink, my great great grandfather.

Other family names that have evolved over the years are Beavins, Bevins or Bivens, and maybe before that it was originally ap Evans, which means “of Evan”, as in “son of Evan” in Ireland and Wales.

Then there were different spellings, Talmadge became Talmage, as in America’s first spies. Stillwell, was spelled Stilwell sometimes. In looking for information about my great great grandmother Nancy Qualls, I can’t overlook Quarles and Quails.

Some of my family names have seemed fixed through the years: Rose, Miller, McKay, Scott… although Scott was written Schott in a marriage record once, Rose can turn up as Ross in some families; Miller can be Millar; McKay might be McKee… It’s good to keep these things in mind when looking for specific documents that don’t seem to exist.

How about your family names?  What differences have turned up in your research?

Jan

Here’s how I’m related to some of these people.

Me > Dad > Kathryn McKay, she was called “Kat” > Olive Wink > Sansom Wink > Jacob Adam Wink > Adam Wink > Jacob Wink, Esq. b. 1733, Bedford, PA > Sebastian Wink b. 1705 in Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands, immigrated and returned to die in France > Isaac VanDerVinck

Me > Dad > Kathryn McKay > Olive Wink > Sansom Wink > Jacob Adam Wink > Adam Wink > Jacob Wink, Esq. who married Elizabeth Truax > Larue Jacob Truex > Phillip Truex > Jacob Du Trieux > Philippe Du Trieux > Philippe DuTrieux, b. 1586, Roubaix, Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, arrived New Amsterdam, 1624.

Me > Dad > Kathryn McKay > Donald Graham McKay > Robert McKay who married Catherine Blue > Donald Daniel Blue (great great grandfather of Ronald Reagan) > Donald Neil Blue b. 1799 in Kilcalmonell, County, Argylshire Highlands of Scotland

 
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Posted by on July 1, 2014 in McKay, Miller, Rose, Scott

 

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A Lard is a Lord

Did you know that the name Lard probably came about from a mispronunciation and then misspelling of the name Laird, which is Scottish for the title, lord.

My great great grandmother was a Lard. Judi—maybe Judith—Isabell Lard. Some family notes called her Bell. She was born just after the Civil War, 1867 to be exact, in Waterloo, Lauderdale County, Alabama.

Lauderdale County is the county in the upper left hand corner of the state of Alabama.  That’s the northwest corner. The southern border is the Tennessee River. Waterloo was one of the original town sites established when the county was created in 1818, just a year after Alabama Territory was established. Waterloo, on the bank of the river, flooded and moved a few times through the years but the little town is still there. Pickwick Landing Dam was built upstream from Waterloo and the Tennessee Valley Authority intentionally flooded the area to create Pickwick Lake.

Waterloo also has the dubious honor of being the starting point for the Trail of Tears where the Cherokee, one of the Five Civilized Tribes were forcibly marched from their native lands in the southeast to newly laid out Indian territory, now the state of Oklahoma. The Indian Removal Act was signed in 1830 by President Andrew Jackson and Indian removal started in 1831. The Cherokee were the last to be removed, leaving their native Alabama homes in 1838.

Lauderdale County is kind of “home base” for my Scott family heritage, and July 28, 1885 Judi Lard married into the Scott family, when she wed William Charlie Scott. William Charlie is the grandson of John Scott who was the first Scott to settle there. Charlie and Judi Scott had the first of their eleven children there, including my great grandpa, Avery Albert Scott.

But back to the Lards. Judi was the daughter of James S. Lard II and his wife Nancy Qualls. He was known as Jim, and he was born across the state line in Hardin County, Tennessee. The word is he, along with a couple of brothers, came “from the north” to Alabama to escape their father who was a mean man.

That “mean man” was James Swan Lard Sr. who was born in Rowan County, North Carolina just after the American Revolution. Sometime before 1809 the Lards, like the Scotts, moved west into Tennessee and January 14, 1809 James Lard Sr. married Elizabeth “Betsy” Shons in Davidson County, Tennessee. James and Betsy had a son, Nathaniel Washington in Bedford County, Tennessee in 1816. Another son, Richard, was born in Williamson County, Tennessee in 1825 and ten years later in 1835, James Swan Jr. was born in Hardin County, Tennessee.

James Swan Lard Sr. was born in 1789, the son of Nathaniel Swan Laird. Nathaniel is the immigrant ancestor of this line and he was born in 1755 in the Orkney Islands, Scotland. These islands are north of the far north east shore of Scotland. They are separated from the mainland by about six miles of seaway. The history of the islands goes back to ancient times and they were under Norwegian rule in the 8th and 9th centuries. The Vikings used the islands as a base of operations for their pirate raids into the Scottish mainland and Norway.

Sometime after 1755 Nathaniel Swan Laird came to America. I don’t yet know if he came alone as a young adult, or came as part of a family group with siblings and parents. He was, however, a patriot during the Revolutionary War. I don’t know where he would have landed, but he ended up in North Carolina and that is where is was married in Rowan County. He married Agnes Scott January 17, 1781, Since my Scott historical research only extends to Buncombe County, North Carolina where John Scott was born in 1800 I have no idea if Agnes Scott might be a part of my primary Scott line.

Charlie and Judi Lard Scott came to Oklahoma about 1900-ish and the last of their children were born here in 1902 and 1904. The rest of the Lard family remained in the vicinity of Lauderdale County/Hardin County along the Alabama/Tennessee state line but I’m sure many descendants have spread out to other areas since then.

There’s more to the story of the Lard/Laird family in the Orkney Island and here in America, but this will do for now. I’m writing this because I recently met a 6th cousin along this line.  He descends from Richard Lard, born in 1825, older brother of James Swan Lard Jr. Their father, James Swan Lard Sr., is our 4th great-grandfather. I wonder if he’s heard anything about James Sr being “mean.”

I’d love to hear from anyone out there who knows more about this line, these people and these events. My new-found cousin tells me Richard, his 3x great-grandfather fought for the Union in Tennessee for six months at the beginning of the Civil War. Then he deserted and later fought for the Confederates. Those are the kinds of stories that bring history alive for me.

Let me know if you have anything to add.

Jan

Nathaniel Swan Laird > James Swan Lard Sr. > James S, Lard Jr. > Judi Isabell Lard (Scott) > Avery Albert Scott > Lela Mae Scott (Rose) > mom > me.

 
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Posted by on June 29, 2014 in Scott

 

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Scotts Creek

I’m reading a lot of North Carolina history lately, trying to get a handle on what life was like about the time my 4X great-grandfather John Scott, was born. He was born in Buncombe County in 1800. Ashville is the county seat of modern-day Buncombe County, but at the time it was just a wilderness at the edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Buncombe County was formed in 1792 and encompassed the entire western end of North Carolina. There were a few trading trails crisscrossing the county, and a few scattered settlements, but it was rough rugged land and settlers were on their own. As soon as the county was established the flood gates opened and pioneers, especially veterans of the Revolutionary War came to stake a claim.

Huge land grants were issued and in 1796 over a quarter of a million acres was granted to David Allison. This huge parcel was outlined by “Hominy creek, Mill’s and Davidson’s rivers, Scott’s creek, Big Pigeon and down it to Twelve-Mile creek to the French Broad and to the beginning.”

Did you catch Scotts Creek there in the land description?

I found all this on a history of western North Carolina website and a few paragraphs later I found another reference to Scotts Creek.

SCOTT’S CREEK. As this creek was on the eastern border of the Cherokee country from which the Indians were removed, and as Gen. Winfield Scott was in charge of their removal in 1835-38, some suppose that the creek took its name from him; but in two grants to Charles McDowell, James Glascow and David Miller, dated December 3, 1795, (Buncombe Deed Book No. 4, p. 104) the State conveyed 300 acres on the waters of Scott’s creek, waters of Tuckaseegee river, including the forks of Scotts creek and “what was said to be Scott’s old lick blocks,” and on the same date there was a further grant to the same parties to 300 acres on the same stream, including a cane brake, with the same reference to Scott’s old lick blocks. (Book 8, p. 85.) But a careful search revealed no grant to any Scott in that section at or near that time; and the Scott who gave his name to this fine stream was doubtless but a landless squatter who was grazing and salting his cattle on the wild lands of that day. He probably lived in Haywood county, near the head of Richland creek.

Haywood county was formed in 1809 just west of Buncombe, going all the way to Tennessee, but when I googled Richland Creek I didn’t find one in the area.

There’s no way to know if this might have been one of our Scotts, but whoever it was didn’t stay long enough to leave a trail.

The American Revolution ended in 1782, eighteen years before John Scott was born. That’s an awfully long time for his father to have fought in the war, but maybe his grandfather did, depending on how old he was between 1776 and 1782. Never the less, sometime late in the century, John Scott’s father was in the mountains of western North Carolina. Since the area was so sparsely populated, it seems to me he brought his wife with him, although she may have arrived in the area with her family about the same time. The young couple would have established a home there in the 1790s.

They would have cut down trees, probably along a creek, to make room for a log cabin where John and his siblings were born. The Scotts wouldn’t stay long in North Carolina but head west to settlements in newly opened lands in Tennessee and then south along the Natchez Trace where our John Scott would cut down trees along Bumpass Creek, and carve out a home north of Waterloo, Alabama. He would have 15 kids of two wives and fairly cram that section of Lauderdale County with Scotts, so many that eventually many would pick up and move west again to settle in Texas, and then later in Oklahoma.

Seems we were trailblazers all along the way, arriving in new areas with the first wave of settlers.

Jan

 

 
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Posted by on June 22, 2014 in Scott

 

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Ships Passing Under a Full Moon on a Cloudless Night

Today I crossed paths with a woman named whose last name was Scott.

I mentioned my grandmother’s maiden name was Scott and in working on my family tree I’ve found boatloads—or I guess wagon loads would be a more apt description—of Scotts who came to Oklahoma way back when. Many more Scotts than I ever met or knew existed here in Oklahoma. I thought she might offer a bit of information about her family and we might compare a note or two.

Nope.

My words just laid there like a lazy dog napping on the porch on a steamy summer afternoon.

I thought it was curious that she didn’t have at least a comment about it. I mean, isn’t everyone interested in their family history?

I guess not.

But to be fair, it was likely her married name, so she may not know anything about her husband’s family. Maybe he died and she doesn’t know any of his kin. Or maybe she’s divorced and it was really ugly and she doesn’t want anything to do with his folks.

Fortunately it was fleeting so it wasn’t too awkward. Kind of like ships that pass in the night when there’s a full moon. We saw each other had a brief conversation, but then it was over.

That’s all.

Jan

PS ~ My grandmother is Lela Mae Scott Rose; daughter of Avery Albert Scott, son of William Charlie Scott, son of Jeremiah Franklin Scott, son of John Scott.

 
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Posted by on June 21, 2014 in Random Observations, Scott

 

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Pvt. John Wesley Rose, Co. B 314th Infantry

Ed Rose
Oklahoma City, OK

April 20, 1944

Dear brother and family

I got your letter today. Sure was glad to hear from you all but I sure have been places since I seen you all last. I have been in Boston, Mass. A friend and I went on a pass and went to Providence, Rhode Island and stayed overnight. …
Well I am a long ways farther from  home than Boston now. I am in England somewhere, I can’t tell you just where. I went on a pass and went to Liverpool, England. …
Tell the kiddos hello. Will try to write more next time.
So long, your loving brother, John.

May 2, 1944

Dear Brother and family

I received your letter today that you mailed the 17 of April, I sure was glad to get it too. Well this much I can tell you all, I am still in England and pretty good. … Ed when have you been down to Willies last and how was he? You can tell him when you see him again that I am getting ready to pay a visit to the Germans. …tell him that I am in England going further some of these days. …
Well our camp is located on a golf course and we are all living in tents. We have a nice camp and pretty good eats. …
Well Bub, I think of you all every day and I know you all do me. I will quit for this time. I have to go write to my wife yet.

When Uncle Wes wrote that letter seventy years ago he was in Company B, 314th Regiment of the 79th Division of George S. Patton’s 3rd Army. He was billeted at Goldbourne Park, a golf course between Liverpool and Manchester. It was April 1944, late in the preparations for the invasion and quartering was scarce. Plans were for the 79th to remain in reserve with the 3rd Army until it was time to break out of Normandy and onto the plains of France. But German movement caused a change in plans and in May they were reassigned and moved to an assembly area near Southampton on the southern coast of England.

On June 13, one week after the initial D-Day invasion, the 79th was en route across the channel. Battle debris still filled the crossing. When they disembarked they marched up Utah Beach, through the messy remains of the D-Day battle, seven days past. They marched toward Cherbourg and on June 19 orders came down committing the regiment to its first combat. It was October 24—127 days later—before the 314th Regiment was withdrawn from combat for a needed break at Luneville. For the first time in months the men ate hot meals, slept in beds with a roof over their heads, enjoyed hot showers and clean clothes.

In the meantime, in a letter of September 23 Uncle Wes writes that he has been in the hospital “2–3 weeks.” I haven’t been able to find out when or where he was wounded and when he returned to his unit, but he was back on the front lines in October and November 1944. Sometime in November, Pvt. John Rose was separated from his unit and lost behind enemy lines. Several letters to him were returned stamped Missing. He survived his time behind German lines and managed to rejoin his unit November 27. Three days later, Nov. 30, 1944, he was killed in action in the difficult fighting to take Haguenau in the Alsace region of France.

Uncle Wes was 36 years old when he died. He and his wife Ruby didn’t have any children, and they spent a lot of time with my mom and her brother. Wes never failed to ask about “the kiddos” in his letters home. He wrote his wife Ruby every few days but since they didn’t have children I don’t know if anyone else in the family has those letters. My mom has the half-dozen or so letters he wrote to his brother Ed “and family.”

Private John Wesley Rose was first buried in France and then disinterred and returned home after the war to be buried in the Lexington Cemetery. He is listed on the veterans memorial in Lexington, Oklahoma.

 

 

 
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Posted by on June 7, 2014 in Rose

 

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Fifteen Kids!

Sometime before 1823 John Scott of Buncombe County, North Carolina established his home in Lauderdale County, Alabama just a few miles south of the Tennessee state line. I have that he was born August 25, 1800, but I don’t know where that date came from so speak up if you have better information.

He’s the ancestor that donated the land for the Bumpass Creek Baptist Church I wrote about a few posts back.

In 1823 he married Mary Elizabeth Carson in Lauderdale County. She was born in 1807 in North Carolina. John was 23 years old, and Mary was 16. I wonder if John knew Mary back in North Carolina and he was waiting for her to grow up so he could marry her. On the other hand, the county was newly opened to settlers and many of them came from the Carolinas so when he was ready to settle down their paths crossed and they set up housekeeping together.

Their first child, a son, was born in Lauderdale County in 1825. They named him William Moore Scott. It’s one of the few unique names in the family tree. It’s hard to know where the name came from, but a popular naming custom was to name sons after military leaders, and more specifically after the captain of a father or grandfather’s regiment. Maybe we’ll find out more about the Scott family during the American Revolution one of these days and see if something shakes loose along this line of thinking.

It was also popular to name sons after presidents and the Scotts have done this through the years. John and Mary picked the name James Monroe Scott for their second child born in 1826.

Next they had a daughter, Charlott Matilda who was born in 1827 and unfortunately died three years later. We don’t know if she suffered ill-health or was the victim of an accident, something that was all too common in new settlements.

Another girl arrived a year later, Catherine Tennessee “Tennie” Scott was born in 1828, and in 1830 Caroline Malinda Scott arrived. Saleta Jane Scott,  born in 1831—she would die at age 15—was the fourth in a run of daughters.

In 1833 John Madison Scott was born and Jeremiah Franklin “Frank” was born in 1834. Poindexter D. Scott—another easy-to-track name—was born in 1836 and a year later, in 1837, another son, Rufus Carmack Scott was born. After having ten kids in 12 years, Mary was just 30 years old. It was four years before her last child, Elizabeth was born in 1841.

Mary Carson Scott died in 1842 leaving John with ten kids ages 1 to 16. The older boys, at 15 and 16 were obviously helping farm the land. Keeping house and tending to the baby probably fell to 13-year-old Tennie and her sisters, ages 11 and 10.

It was a couple of years before a new mom joined the family. John married Harriet Frances Ferrell June 9, 1844. She was born in South Carolina in 1810. She was 34 years old. Her first husband, Samuel Jack Thompson, died about 1843. I don’t have her children on my family tree, but there are Thompson family trees that say there were eight Thompson children ages 1–16 who joined the Scott family, making a blended family of 20. And then they had four more kids! Talk about yours, mine, and ours!

Mary Ann Scott, the first of John and Harriet’s children, was born in 1845 and she died at age five in 1850. In 1848, Thomas Jefferson Scott (another presidential name) was born. Camilie Alabama Scott was born in 1850, and the baby of the family, Robert Neal Scott, was born in 1854.

John Scott received a land grant for the Bumpass Creek farm in 1832. He shows up in the US Census of 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1880. In 1866 he’s listed on the Alabama State Census listed along with the families of Frank Scott (Jeremiah Franklin), John Scott (John Madison?), Billy Scott (William Moore?), Betsy Scott (a widowed spouse?), and James Scott (James Monroe?).

Here are the names and dates as I have them. Please don’t take them as gospel until I can add records to substantiate them. And If you have different information, I’m all ears.

Generation 1

JOHN1 SCOTT was born August 25, 1800 in Buncombe County, North Carolina, and died March 27, 1884 in Lauderdale County, Alabama.  In 1823 in Lauderdale Co., AL he married 1) MARY ELIZABETH CARSON, b 1807, North Carolina; d. 1842 in Waterloo, Lauderdale Co., AL. June 9, 1844 in Lauderdale Co., Alabama John married 2) HARRIET FRANCES FERRELL Thompson b. Nov. 4, 1810, South Carolina; d. Dec. 8, 1880, Lauderdale Co., AL.

Children of JOHN SCOTT and MARY ELIZABETH CARSON were all born and died in Lauderdale Co., Alabama with two exceptions as indicated.

  1. WILLIAM MOORE SCOTT, b. February 24, 1825; d. March 24, 1866.
  2. JAMES MONROE SCOTT, b. April 22, 1826; d. 1884.
  3. CHARLOTT MATILDA SCOTT, b. 1827, d. 1830. Died at age 3
  4. CATHERINE TENNESSEE “TENNIE” SCOTT, b. 1828, d. 1902.
  5. CAROLINE MALINDA SCOTT, b. 1830, d. 1863.
  6. SALETA JANE SCOTT, b. 1831, d. 1847. Died at age 15
  7. JOHN MADISON SCOTT, b. 1833.
  8. JEREMIAH FRANKLIN2 “FRANK” SCOTT, b. Sept. 5, 1834; d. Nov. 11, 1884.
  9. POINDEXTER D. SCOTT, b.  Sept. 2, 1836; d. May 3, 1911.
  10. RUFUS CARMACK SCOTT, b. Nov. 27, 1837; d. Aug. 4, 1907.
  11. ELIZABETH W SCOTT, b. Sept. 9, 1841; d. Aug. 2, 1872.

Children of JOHN SCOTT and HARRIET FRANCES FERRELL Thompson are:

  1. MARY ANN SCOTT, b. March 3, 1845; d. 1850. Died at age 5.
  2. THOMAS JEFFERSON SCOTT, b. April 30, 1848; d. April 18, 1933, Barton, MO.
  3. CAMILIE ALABAMA SCOTT, b. June 26, 1850; d. May 20, 1932.
  4. ROBERT NEAL SCOTT, b. Oct. 4, 1854; d. Jan. 17, 1909, Hardin Co., TN

Whew! There’s so much more to say about the folks listed on this page, but we’ll tackle this a little at a time. If you’re descended from one of these Scotts I want to hear from you.

Stay tuned!

Jan

4x great-granddaughter of John Scott > Jeremiah Franklin Scott > William Charlie Scott > Avery Albert Scott > Lela Mae Scott Rose > Darlene Rose Miller > Jan Miller Stratton

 

 
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Posted by on June 2, 2014 in Scott

 

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