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The Oklahoma Scott Family Reunion 2015

The first Sunday in June is the time, and the park in Wynnewood, Oklahoma is the place of the Oklahoma Scott family reunion. We heard about it just in time to go. Wynnewood was the home of William Charlie Scott, my great great grandpa, and for years dozens of descendants of his ten kids would gather for the day.

Family of William Charlie Scott

The family of William Charlie Scott taken on the day of his funeral. He died April 20, 1933. His wife, Judia Isabelle Lard Scott is front left. Nancy Scott, his daughter with Nancy Qualls is next, then his oldest sons Jesse Andrew and Avery Albert. Apart from Mamie, I’m at a loss as to who’s who  on the back row. Any cousins out there who can help?

When I was a kid we filled the park. Food covered all the picnic tables in the pavilion and we spread out across the park on lawn chairs and picnic blankets. The food was all homemade, except a couple of loaves of the mandatory Rainbow bread. White bread and butter went with every meal. There was fried chicken, potato salad, deviled eggs, baked beans, cole slaw and tons of other stuff. Banana pudding was a mandatory dessert, sometimes several versions, cakes in all flavors, and lots of pie. Apple pie, cherry pie, pecan pie, peach cobbler, blueberry cobbler, and there was probably a pan of brownies.

Someone brought a set of horseshoes and after selecting the biggest shady spot they could find, the stakes were measured off and pounded into the ground where the men would congregate, most of them smokers. The clank of horseshoes and smell of the air, stopping only long enough for one of the eldest attendees to say grace before the meal. Well the clanking paused for a minute or two, the smoke was continuous. The women folk—that’s old-timey talk for moms and grandmas—set up lawn chairs and spread pallets—usually handmade quilts—under the shade of a different tree. Every patch of that shade was covered with a picnic blanket, usually anchored by a picnic basket or thermos to keep them from blowing away in the Oklahoma wind.

Us kids were left to fend for ourselves so we made use of a few swings, a couple of wooden teeter-totters, and one of those old merry-go-rounds you have to get a dad to push to go really fast, and if you don’t hang on you’ll slide to the edge and get slung to the ground, Probably why most parks have taken them out in recent years. I always sat  in the middle and squeezed my eyes tight to keep from getting sick.

There might be seventy or eighty kin gathered for the day. And that didn’t include the kids. But times have changed. This year there were maybe thirty or so adults at the park. There were just a few smokers (all the old-timers died of smoking related causes, mostly heart attacks) and no one brought horseshoes. Much of the food was store-bought. We even picked up chicken at Homeland on our way down. And after the food  was spread out (there was plenty!) there was still room for all of us to sit and eat at a picnic table in the shade of the pavilion. No need for lawn chairs or pallets on the ground. Alas.

As far as I know there were only two of Charlie’s ten kids were represented at the reunion with descendants of Jesse and Avery in attendance.

Jesse Andrew Scott, the oldest, born in 1886, had lived in Wynnewood near his folks and some of his kids and grandkids still live in the area. It’s that bunch that organizes the reunion and keeps it going. Some of them came up from Texas just for the reunion. The second son, Avery Albert, born in 1889, was my great grandpa. There were four of us there. Mom, one of her cousins, Kay Scott Talley, her husband Lester, and me.

I printed the ancestry.com person pages for each of William Charlies kids and took it to use as a reference point for introductions. It was very helpful. I wrote the barest bit of family history I could put on a half-a-sheet of paper for those who might not know where we came from. I overheard someone say “They came from Alabama?” so the history was also helpful.  Here’s what I wrote.

A Brief Scott Family History

John Scott was born in 1800 in Buncombe County, North Carolina in the vicinity of present day Ashville. About 1820 he moved to Alabama (opened for settlement in 1818) by way of Tennessee where his two brothers settled. John and his sister Isabelle Scott Lambert settled in Lauderdale County in the far northwest corner of the state. John was single when he obtained his land, but in 1823 he married and started a family. He had ten kids when his wife died so he remarried and had four more kids. All 14 of his kids were born along Bumpass Creek near Waterloo, Alabama in Lauderdale County.

John donated some of his land for the Bumpass Creek Free Will Baptist Church, which still has an active congregation. My mom, Darlene Miller painted a picture of the church from a photo taken during a visit to the area. I photographed the painting and have made some postcards of the church.

Jeremiah Franklin was born in 1834, one of John’s of the first ten kids. “Frank” married Mary Harriett Serelda Steely and they started a family in Lauderdale County.  They would have 13 kids, all born in Alabama.

William Charlie, born in 1860, was Frank’s 2nd son. Charlie married Nancy Qualls and after they had a daughter Nancy died. Charlie then married Judia Isabelle Lard (Laird) and they had nine kids, eight sons and one daughter.

The Scotts had filled up most of their neck of the woods along Bumpass Creek in Lauderdale County and started moving west.  Jeremiah Franklin’s oldest son moved to Texas where he married and had three sons. Of the remaining nine kids, six came to Oklahoma—the others stayed in Alabama—Charlie was one of the six who came and brought his family.

Charlie and Judi had three sons, then between 1891 and 1894 they moved to Oklahoma, near Box in Cleveland County, and had six more kids.

Avery, Charlie’s 2nd son, was my great grandpa. “Aunt Lela” was my grandma. My mom is Darlene Rose Miller and I’m Jan Miller Stratton.

Scott-WmCharlieFam1901

The William Charlie Scott Family, circa 1900. On the front row from the left: Rayford Charley, 1900; William Charlie, 1860; Eldry, 1896; Judi Lard Scott, 1867; Ernal Mason, 1896. On the back row from the left: Jesse Andrew, 1886; Colbert, 1894; Stanley Luther, 1891; and Avery Albert, 1989

This is a picture we’ve had and apart from Charlie and Judi, we didn’t know who was who. But thanks to mom’s cousin Kay Scott Talley, we think we figured it out.  She knew for sure the one on the back right was Avery, her grandpa, and the one on the back row with the ruffled collar was Colbert. Based on that we made an educated guess and named the others.

Avery and Colbert would grow up to marry sisters, (Doan and Chub Crouch) so we were double cousins with Colbert’s kids and grandkids.. Colbert and Avery both lived in far southeast Cleveland County near the community of Box so we knew those cousins better than some of the others. Charlie and Judi first settled in Box when they came to Oklahoma, but after all the kids were born they moved south to eventually settle in Wynnewood.

That’s about the sum of it for this year. Colbert and Chub’s kids (there are just a couple of their eleven kids left), grandkids and great grandkids have a “Scott Cousins Reunion” is what  they call it. We’ve been invited to that  later this summer. There’s talk of a reunion in Waterloo, Alabama as well which I would love to turn into a family research trip if the timing works out for me to go.

Seems like there aren’t as many family reunions as there used to be. How about you? Got plans to see family this summer?

Jan

John Scott > Jeremiah Franklin Scott > William Charlie Scott > Avery Albert Scott > Lela Scott Rose > Darlene Rose Miller > Jan Miller Stratton

 

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Posted by on June 8, 2015 in Scott

 

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Two Working Oxen

In 1860 John Scott–my 4x great grandpa–farmed 90 acres and owned another 300 acres of unimproved land along Bumpass Creek in Lauderdale County, Alabama. His farm was worth $1,600. He owned another $200 worth of farm equipment.  He owned 6 horses, 4 “asses and mules”; 5 “milch cows”; 2 working oxen; 20 other cattle; 15 sheep; and 35 swine. The livestock was valued at $1750 on Schedule 4—Productions of Agriculture in the Western Division of Lauderdale County, Alabama.

Scott-etc-1866-nonPopSchedule copy

The previous year his farm produced 45 bushels of wheat; 1000 bushels of Indian corn; 35 pounds of wool; 16 bushels of Irish potatoes; 30 bushels of sweet potatoes; 50 pounds of butter; 4 tons of hay; and 70 gallons of molasses. The value of his homemade manufacturing was $10 and the value of his slaughtered animals was $170.

John at age 59, had a personal estate valued at $4500 in addition to the $1,600 real estate. His wife Harriet had a personal estate of $700 with $600 of real estate. She and John had four children. Mary Ann was the first, born in 1845 and she died at the age of five. The other children were listed on the 1860 census: Thomas, age 12; Camille, age 9 and Robert, age 5.

Scotts on 1860 census

1860 census includes John Scott Jr, his wife and kids; Frank, my 3x great grandpa, Jeremiah Franklin with his wife and son; Harriet Scott and five of her children; her son George Thompson and his family; James Scott who was incorrectly identified as “Thompson” with the ditto marks the census taker continued down the page. The last entry is John Scott Sr., also incorrectly identified as Thompson.

 

Harriet Thompson Scott, John’s second wife, had an 80-acre farm of her own which she inherited from her first husband. Her farm was worth $600 with $100 worth of farm equipment. She had 3 horses, 1 milk cow, 2 oxen, 5 other cattle, 15 sheep, and 20 swine with a total value of $400. Her farm produced 12 bushels of wheat, 475 bushels of Indian corn, 35 pounds of wool, 25 bushels of Irish potatoes, 50 pounds of butter, one ton of hay, $25 worth of homemade goods, and slaughtered livestock valued at $135.

1860 Ag Census

This detail lists sons John Jr. and  Frank (Jeremiah Franklin); Harriet, his second wife; son James; John Scott Sr., and another son, William Scott. Next is John Lamb Sr. and his son John Lamb Jr.; then another Scott son, Poindexter, who married a daughter of John Lamb; Spencer Lard or Lord, who has no farm, but $15 in farm equipment. I haven’t placed him yet, but it seems he might live on the farm of one of the Scotts. Next is Weatherly Haines, and William Scott, a brother of John Scott Sr.

Further down the page I found John’s sister, Isabella Scott Lambert. Her husband Abner, has died leaving her the farm.

I included the columns for Improved acres, Unimproved acres, Value of farm, Value of farm Implements.

 

Isabella Scott Lambert farm

The page included other familiar names, Black and a couple of Webbs..

John’s youngest son Rufus, 22, was a newlywed. He and his wife Elizabeth, 18, were listed in the same household with his father.

John’s youngest daughter, Elizabeth married John W. Haines (Weatherly). When she died he married her sister Catherine Tennessee, Tennie, Scott.

John’s first wife was probably Mary Carson and Jobe Carson is also listed further down the page. At 40-years-old he might be a nephew if there’s any connection at all.

I know there are other relatives I’ll find when I take time to look at more pages of this census. I’m fascinated with the details of their lives on the brink of the Civil War.

Jan

 
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Posted by on December 30, 2014 in Scott

 

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A Lard is a Lord

Did you know that the name Lard probably came about from a mispronunciation and then misspelling of the name Laird, which is Scottish for the title, lord.

My great great grandmother was a Lard. Judi—maybe Judith—Isabell Lard. Some family notes called her Bell. She was born just after the Civil War, 1867 to be exact, in Waterloo, Lauderdale County, Alabama.

Lauderdale County is the county in the upper left hand corner of the state of Alabama.  That’s the northwest corner. The southern border is the Tennessee River. Waterloo was one of the original town sites established when the county was created in 1818, just a year after Alabama Territory was established. Waterloo, on the bank of the river, flooded and moved a few times through the years but the little town is still there. Pickwick Landing Dam was built upstream from Waterloo and the Tennessee Valley Authority intentionally flooded the area to create Pickwick Lake.

Waterloo also has the dubious honor of being the starting point for the Trail of Tears where the Cherokee, one of the Five Civilized Tribes were forcibly marched from their native lands in the southeast to newly laid out Indian territory, now the state of Oklahoma. The Indian Removal Act was signed in 1830 by President Andrew Jackson and Indian removal started in 1831. The Cherokee were the last to be removed, leaving their native Alabama homes in 1838.

Lauderdale County is kind of “home base” for my Scott family heritage, and July 28, 1885 Judi Lard married into the Scott family, when she wed William Charlie Scott. William Charlie is the grandson of John Scott who was the first Scott to settle there. Charlie and Judi Scott had the first of their eleven children there, including my great grandpa, Avery Albert Scott.

But back to the Lards. Judi was the daughter of James S. Lard II and his wife Nancy Qualls. He was known as Jim, and he was born across the state line in Hardin County, Tennessee. The word is he, along with a couple of brothers, came “from the north” to Alabama to escape their father who was a mean man.

That “mean man” was James Swan Lard Sr. who was born in Rowan County, North Carolina just after the American Revolution. Sometime before 1809 the Lards, like the Scotts, moved west into Tennessee and January 14, 1809 James Lard Sr. married Elizabeth “Betsy” Shons in Davidson County, Tennessee. James and Betsy had a son, Nathaniel Washington in Bedford County, Tennessee in 1816. Another son, Richard, was born in Williamson County, Tennessee in 1825 and ten years later in 1835, James Swan Jr. was born in Hardin County, Tennessee.

James Swan Lard Sr. was born in 1789, the son of Nathaniel Swan Laird. Nathaniel is the immigrant ancestor of this line and he was born in 1755 in the Orkney Islands, Scotland. These islands are north of the far north east shore of Scotland. They are separated from the mainland by about six miles of seaway. The history of the islands goes back to ancient times and they were under Norwegian rule in the 8th and 9th centuries. The Vikings used the islands as a base of operations for their pirate raids into the Scottish mainland and Norway.

Sometime after 1755 Nathaniel Swan Laird came to America. I don’t yet know if he came alone as a young adult, or came as part of a family group with siblings and parents. He was, however, a patriot during the Revolutionary War. I don’t know where he would have landed, but he ended up in North Carolina and that is where is was married in Rowan County. He married Agnes Scott January 17, 1781, Since my Scott historical research only extends to Buncombe County, North Carolina where John Scott was born in 1800 I have no idea if Agnes Scott might be a part of my primary Scott line.

Charlie and Judi Lard Scott came to Oklahoma about 1900-ish and the last of their children were born here in 1902 and 1904. The rest of the Lard family remained in the vicinity of Lauderdale County/Hardin County along the Alabama/Tennessee state line but I’m sure many descendants have spread out to other areas since then.

There’s more to the story of the Lard/Laird family in the Orkney Island and here in America, but this will do for now. I’m writing this because I recently met a 6th cousin along this line.  He descends from Richard Lard, born in 1825, older brother of James Swan Lard Jr. Their father, James Swan Lard Sr., is our 4th great-grandfather. I wonder if he’s heard anything about James Sr being “mean.”

I’d love to hear from anyone out there who knows more about this line, these people and these events. My new-found cousin tells me Richard, his 3x great-grandfather fought for the Union in Tennessee for six months at the beginning of the Civil War. Then he deserted and later fought for the Confederates. Those are the kinds of stories that bring history alive for me.

Let me know if you have anything to add.

Jan

Nathaniel Swan Laird > James Swan Lard Sr. > James S, Lard Jr. > Judi Isabell Lard (Scott) > Avery Albert Scott > Lela Mae Scott (Rose) > mom > me.

 
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Posted by on June 29, 2014 in Scott

 

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Scotts Creek

I’m reading a lot of North Carolina history lately, trying to get a handle on what life was like about the time my 4X great-grandfather John Scott, was born. He was born in Buncombe County in 1800. Ashville is the county seat of modern-day Buncombe County, but at the time it was just a wilderness at the edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Buncombe County was formed in 1792 and encompassed the entire western end of North Carolina. There were a few trading trails crisscrossing the county, and a few scattered settlements, but it was rough rugged land and settlers were on their own. As soon as the county was established the flood gates opened and pioneers, especially veterans of the Revolutionary War came to stake a claim.

Huge land grants were issued and in 1796 over a quarter of a million acres was granted to David Allison. This huge parcel was outlined by “Hominy creek, Mill’s and Davidson’s rivers, Scott’s creek, Big Pigeon and down it to Twelve-Mile creek to the French Broad and to the beginning.”

Did you catch Scotts Creek there in the land description?

I found all this on a history of western North Carolina website and a few paragraphs later I found another reference to Scotts Creek.

SCOTT’S CREEK. As this creek was on the eastern border of the Cherokee country from which the Indians were removed, and as Gen. Winfield Scott was in charge of their removal in 1835-38, some suppose that the creek took its name from him; but in two grants to Charles McDowell, James Glascow and David Miller, dated December 3, 1795, (Buncombe Deed Book No. 4, p. 104) the State conveyed 300 acres on the waters of Scott’s creek, waters of Tuckaseegee river, including the forks of Scotts creek and “what was said to be Scott’s old lick blocks,” and on the same date there was a further grant to the same parties to 300 acres on the same stream, including a cane brake, with the same reference to Scott’s old lick blocks. (Book 8, p. 85.) But a careful search revealed no grant to any Scott in that section at or near that time; and the Scott who gave his name to this fine stream was doubtless but a landless squatter who was grazing and salting his cattle on the wild lands of that day. He probably lived in Haywood county, near the head of Richland creek.

Haywood county was formed in 1809 just west of Buncombe, going all the way to Tennessee, but when I googled Richland Creek I didn’t find one in the area.

There’s no way to know if this might have been one of our Scotts, but whoever it was didn’t stay long enough to leave a trail.

The American Revolution ended in 1782, eighteen years before John Scott was born. That’s an awfully long time for his father to have fought in the war, but maybe his grandfather did, depending on how old he was between 1776 and 1782. Never the less, sometime late in the century, John Scott’s father was in the mountains of western North Carolina. Since the area was so sparsely populated, it seems to me he brought his wife with him, although she may have arrived in the area with her family about the same time. The young couple would have established a home there in the 1790s.

They would have cut down trees, probably along a creek, to make room for a log cabin where John and his siblings were born. The Scotts wouldn’t stay long in North Carolina but head west to settlements in newly opened lands in Tennessee and then south along the Natchez Trace where our John Scott would cut down trees along Bumpass Creek, and carve out a home north of Waterloo, Alabama. He would have 15 kids of two wives and fairly cram that section of Lauderdale County with Scotts, so many that eventually many would pick up and move west again to settle in Texas, and then later in Oklahoma.

Seems we were trailblazers all along the way, arriving in new areas with the first wave of settlers.

Jan

 

 
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Posted by on June 22, 2014 in Scott

 

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Ships Passing Under a Full Moon on a Cloudless Night

Today I crossed paths with a woman named whose last name was Scott.

I mentioned my grandmother’s maiden name was Scott and in working on my family tree I’ve found boatloads—or I guess wagon loads would be a more apt description—of Scotts who came to Oklahoma way back when. Many more Scotts than I ever met or knew existed here in Oklahoma. I thought she might offer a bit of information about her family and we might compare a note or two.

Nope.

My words just laid there like a lazy dog napping on the porch on a steamy summer afternoon.

I thought it was curious that she didn’t have at least a comment about it. I mean, isn’t everyone interested in their family history?

I guess not.

But to be fair, it was likely her married name, so she may not know anything about her husband’s family. Maybe he died and she doesn’t know any of his kin. Or maybe she’s divorced and it was really ugly and she doesn’t want anything to do with his folks.

Fortunately it was fleeting so it wasn’t too awkward. Kind of like ships that pass in the night when there’s a full moon. We saw each other had a brief conversation, but then it was over.

That’s all.

Jan

PS ~ My grandmother is Lela Mae Scott Rose; daughter of Avery Albert Scott, son of William Charlie Scott, son of Jeremiah Franklin Scott, son of John Scott.

 
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Posted by on June 21, 2014 in Random Observations, Scott

 

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Fifteen Kids!

Sometime before 1823 John Scott of Buncombe County, North Carolina established his home in Lauderdale County, Alabama just a few miles south of the Tennessee state line. I have that he was born August 25, 1800, but I don’t know where that date came from so speak up if you have better information.

He’s the ancestor that donated the land for the Bumpass Creek Baptist Church I wrote about a few posts back.

In 1823 he married Mary Elizabeth Carson in Lauderdale County. She was born in 1807 in North Carolina. John was 23 years old, and Mary was 16. I wonder if John knew Mary back in North Carolina and he was waiting for her to grow up so he could marry her. On the other hand, the county was newly opened to settlers and many of them came from the Carolinas so when he was ready to settle down their paths crossed and they set up housekeeping together.

Their first child, a son, was born in Lauderdale County in 1825. They named him William Moore Scott. It’s one of the few unique names in the family tree. It’s hard to know where the name came from, but a popular naming custom was to name sons after military leaders, and more specifically after the captain of a father or grandfather’s regiment. Maybe we’ll find out more about the Scott family during the American Revolution one of these days and see if something shakes loose along this line of thinking.

It was also popular to name sons after presidents and the Scotts have done this through the years. John and Mary picked the name James Monroe Scott for their second child born in 1826.

Next they had a daughter, Charlott Matilda who was born in 1827 and unfortunately died three years later. We don’t know if she suffered ill-health or was the victim of an accident, something that was all too common in new settlements.

Another girl arrived a year later, Catherine Tennessee “Tennie” Scott was born in 1828, and in 1830 Caroline Malinda Scott arrived. Saleta Jane Scott,  born in 1831—she would die at age 15—was the fourth in a run of daughters.

In 1833 John Madison Scott was born and Jeremiah Franklin “Frank” was born in 1834. Poindexter D. Scott—another easy-to-track name—was born in 1836 and a year later, in 1837, another son, Rufus Carmack Scott was born. After having ten kids in 12 years, Mary was just 30 years old. It was four years before her last child, Elizabeth was born in 1841.

Mary Carson Scott died in 1842 leaving John with ten kids ages 1 to 16. The older boys, at 15 and 16 were obviously helping farm the land. Keeping house and tending to the baby probably fell to 13-year-old Tennie and her sisters, ages 11 and 10.

It was a couple of years before a new mom joined the family. John married Harriet Frances Ferrell June 9, 1844. She was born in South Carolina in 1810. She was 34 years old. Her first husband, Samuel Jack Thompson, died about 1843. I don’t have her children on my family tree, but there are Thompson family trees that say there were eight Thompson children ages 1–16 who joined the Scott family, making a blended family of 20. And then they had four more kids! Talk about yours, mine, and ours!

Mary Ann Scott, the first of John and Harriet’s children, was born in 1845 and she died at age five in 1850. In 1848, Thomas Jefferson Scott (another presidential name) was born. Camilie Alabama Scott was born in 1850, and the baby of the family, Robert Neal Scott, was born in 1854.

John Scott received a land grant for the Bumpass Creek farm in 1832. He shows up in the US Census of 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1880. In 1866 he’s listed on the Alabama State Census listed along with the families of Frank Scott (Jeremiah Franklin), John Scott (John Madison?), Billy Scott (William Moore?), Betsy Scott (a widowed spouse?), and James Scott (James Monroe?).

Here are the names and dates as I have them. Please don’t take them as gospel until I can add records to substantiate them. And If you have different information, I’m all ears.

Generation 1

JOHN1 SCOTT was born August 25, 1800 in Buncombe County, North Carolina, and died March 27, 1884 in Lauderdale County, Alabama.  In 1823 in Lauderdale Co., AL he married 1) MARY ELIZABETH CARSON, b 1807, North Carolina; d. 1842 in Waterloo, Lauderdale Co., AL. June 9, 1844 in Lauderdale Co., Alabama John married 2) HARRIET FRANCES FERRELL Thompson b. Nov. 4, 1810, South Carolina; d. Dec. 8, 1880, Lauderdale Co., AL.

Children of JOHN SCOTT and MARY ELIZABETH CARSON were all born and died in Lauderdale Co., Alabama with two exceptions as indicated.

  1. WILLIAM MOORE SCOTT, b. February 24, 1825; d. March 24, 1866.
  2. JAMES MONROE SCOTT, b. April 22, 1826; d. 1884.
  3. CHARLOTT MATILDA SCOTT, b. 1827, d. 1830. Died at age 3
  4. CATHERINE TENNESSEE “TENNIE” SCOTT, b. 1828, d. 1902.
  5. CAROLINE MALINDA SCOTT, b. 1830, d. 1863.
  6. SALETA JANE SCOTT, b. 1831, d. 1847. Died at age 15
  7. JOHN MADISON SCOTT, b. 1833.
  8. JEREMIAH FRANKLIN2 “FRANK” SCOTT, b. Sept. 5, 1834; d. Nov. 11, 1884.
  9. POINDEXTER D. SCOTT, b.  Sept. 2, 1836; d. May 3, 1911.
  10. RUFUS CARMACK SCOTT, b. Nov. 27, 1837; d. Aug. 4, 1907.
  11. ELIZABETH W SCOTT, b. Sept. 9, 1841; d. Aug. 2, 1872.

Children of JOHN SCOTT and HARRIET FRANCES FERRELL Thompson are:

  1. MARY ANN SCOTT, b. March 3, 1845; d. 1850. Died at age 5.
  2. THOMAS JEFFERSON SCOTT, b. April 30, 1848; d. April 18, 1933, Barton, MO.
  3. CAMILIE ALABAMA SCOTT, b. June 26, 1850; d. May 20, 1932.
  4. ROBERT NEAL SCOTT, b. Oct. 4, 1854; d. Jan. 17, 1909, Hardin Co., TN

Whew! There’s so much more to say about the folks listed on this page, but we’ll tackle this a little at a time. If you’re descended from one of these Scotts I want to hear from you.

Stay tuned!

Jan

4x great-granddaughter of John Scott > Jeremiah Franklin Scott > William Charlie Scott > Avery Albert Scott > Lela Mae Scott Rose > Darlene Rose Miller > Jan Miller Stratton

 

 
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Posted by on June 2, 2014 in Scott

 

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John Scott from North Carolina

Lela Mae Scott was born 1911 in Wanette, Oklahoma. In 1928 she married Thomas Edwin “Ed” Rose and later she became my grandmother. We called her “grandma.” No cutesy nickname, just grandma or Aunt Lela to the nieces and nephews—but she also answered to “Aint Leler.”

But this story isn’t about her. It starts with her great grandpa, John Scott who was born in the Blue Ridge Mountains in the Southern Appalachians. Buncombe County to be exact. Buncombe County is in western North Carolina on land the Cherokee occupied until European settlers pushed them out at the end of the 1700s.

After the American Revolution the new country had no money but lots of land. Land was granted to Patriot veterans as payment for services rendered and western North Carolina, on the eastern edge of the mountains was doled out in these land grants. John Scott was born here in 1800 or 1801.

Some sources list Black Mountain, NC—on Interstate 40 just east of Asheville—as his place  of birth, but the town wasn’t incorporated until 1893, more than 90 years after John Scott was born. Regardless of where exactly he was born, the area of western North Carolina soon filled up and it wasn’t long before many headed “over the mountains to see what they could see.”

The Scotts, John and his siblings (more about them at another time), headed west across Tennessee with some settling in the area of Nashville, others settling further south in Tennessee, and our John Scott continuing south, probably along the route of the Natchez Trace, to Alabama. In the 1830 US Census he shows up in Lauderdale County, AL,  just across the Tennessee state line.

The Scotts probably weren’t traveling alone. Familiar names—Haynes and Lamb come to mind—show up in North Carolina and again in Alabama, frequently as Scott spouses.

So now I am on a quest to assemble, and then write, the story of John Scott. Fortunately I’ve recently connected with lots of Scott cousins on a facebook page, Descendants of Waterloo, Alabama Scott Family. A few cousins have done some very detailed family research so I have a pretty good starting point when I add that to the research my mom has done.

The Scotts have been quite fruitful, and have multiplied significantly in just a few generations. It doesn’t take long to multiply when many families had ten or eleven or a dozen kids, who then went on to have another ten or twelve or so.

So stay tuned.  I’ll post what I have on John Scott, his two wives—Mary Carson and Harriet Farrell—and his fifteen children soon. At this stage, everything should be scrutinized and if you descend from some of these people and know more about that line than I do I want to hear from you.

If you’re a Scott descendant follow me by email so I can get in touch with you and we can share family details off-line.

Thanks,

Jan

 
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Posted by on June 2, 2014 in Scott

 

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