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Agnes Laird, Her Widow’s Pension

Laird-Nat-30Nathaniel Laird, 1755–1832, my 5th great-grandfather, was also my Laird immigrant ancestor. I’m not sure if he came from Scotland or Ireland, but I hope to nail that down soon.

He was 20 when the Continental Congress signed the Declaration of Independence, just the right age to sign up to fight in the Revolution. He was a private in the 4th Regiment, Infantry, of the Pennsylvania Line in the Continental Army.

In 1781 he married Agnes Scott in Rowan County, North Carolina where they established a home after the war. In 1789 Iredell County was formed out of the western part of Rowan County and that is where Nathaniel and his family were counted in the 1790 US Census. His five children were all born in North Carolina, the youngest in 1802. Sometime after 1802 and before 1820 the family moved to middle Tennessee and settled in the Maury/Bedford County area.

It was confusing to find him in two different counties at different times on different records. I thought there must be another Nathaniel Laird until I looked at the historical county maps and then found this land record.

On June 21, 1828, Nathaniel Laird received a grant of 75 acres, at the rate of one cent per acre, signed by Sam Houston, governor of Tennessee. (Yes, the same Sam Houston that turned up in Texas.) It was paid into the office of “entry-taker of Maury & Bedford countys;…” Maury and Bedford county lie side-by-side with Maury to the east and Bedford to the west. The land description says: “lying in said county, on the waters of flat creek and bounded as follows to wit, beginning in Maury county, …”

Later records list Nathaniel in Bedford County. Seems the county line moved west, putting all 75 acres in that county. If I can find a more specific description of the location—…north 40 poles to a cedar the NW corner… 40 poles to a dogwood, then south 40 poles to a hickory in a field… while colorful, isn’t enough—I’ll match it to the county maps and see if that’s the case.

Nathaniel died Feb. 27, 1832 and subsequently his wife, Agnes (Scott) Laird applied for a Revolutionary War Widows Pension to continue the pension previously received by her husband. He’d been getting $8 per month since August 1826. Her application was accepted and she received $40 per year starting Dec. 1843, I don’t know if she got “back pay” from when her husband died eleven years earlier or not. But, I came across a simple note that reads:

Agnes Laird
Tennessee

Suspended
let 16 dec 39

Act of 7 July 1838

Evidently there was a LOT of fraud going on in the Revolutionary War Pension system so a couple of times Congress had to revise the program to get rid of the dead beats who shouldn’t be getting a pension. Pensioners reapplied and were accepted or rejected under the new requirements.

Agnes Laird’s application includes her husband’s original statement of his military service dated Dec. 12, 1825; dozen of letters, reports and witness statements documenting his service; statements indicating she was his wife and had not remarried since his death. As soon as I translate more of the colonial penmanship (everything from elaborate calligraphy to  scrawled cursive, many pages splattered and smeared with ink) we’ll get a glimpse of his life as a patriot soldier.

And as to Agnes Scott.  I wonder if she’s part of my grandmother’s Scott line which dead ends with John Scott born in 1800 in Buncombe County, NC. Agnes was born in Rowan County in 1761. Chronologically she could be an aunt, or maybe a cousin to my  4x great-grandfather, John Scott. I hope it’s a mystery I’ll solve.

Jan

Me > my Mom > Grandma Lela Scott Rose (1911, Pottawatome County, OK) > Avery Albert Scott (1887, Lauderdale County, AL) > Judia Isabell Lard Scott (1867, Lauderdale County, AL) > Jim Lard (1830, Hardin County, TN) > James Lard (1789, Rowan County, NC) > Nathaniel Laird (1755, Scotland or Ireland)

 
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Posted by on December 7, 2014 in Scott

 

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A Lard is a Lord

Did you know that the name Lard probably came about from a mispronunciation and then misspelling of the name Laird, which is Scottish for the title, lord.

My great great grandmother was a Lard. Judi—maybe Judith—Isabell Lard. Some family notes called her Bell. She was born just after the Civil War, 1867 to be exact, in Waterloo, Lauderdale County, Alabama.

Lauderdale County is the county in the upper left hand corner of the state of Alabama.  That’s the northwest corner. The southern border is the Tennessee River. Waterloo was one of the original town sites established when the county was created in 1818, just a year after Alabama Territory was established. Waterloo, on the bank of the river, flooded and moved a few times through the years but the little town is still there. Pickwick Landing Dam was built upstream from Waterloo and the Tennessee Valley Authority intentionally flooded the area to create Pickwick Lake.

Waterloo also has the dubious honor of being the starting point for the Trail of Tears where the Cherokee, one of the Five Civilized Tribes were forcibly marched from their native lands in the southeast to newly laid out Indian territory, now the state of Oklahoma. The Indian Removal Act was signed in 1830 by President Andrew Jackson and Indian removal started in 1831. The Cherokee were the last to be removed, leaving their native Alabama homes in 1838.

Lauderdale County is kind of “home base” for my Scott family heritage, and July 28, 1885 Judi Lard married into the Scott family, when she wed William Charlie Scott. William Charlie is the grandson of John Scott who was the first Scott to settle there. Charlie and Judi Scott had the first of their eleven children there, including my great grandpa, Avery Albert Scott.

But back to the Lards. Judi was the daughter of James S. Lard II and his wife Nancy Qualls. He was known as Jim, and he was born across the state line in Hardin County, Tennessee. The word is he, along with a couple of brothers, came “from the north” to Alabama to escape their father who was a mean man.

That “mean man” was James Swan Lard Sr. who was born in Rowan County, North Carolina just after the American Revolution. Sometime before 1809 the Lards, like the Scotts, moved west into Tennessee and January 14, 1809 James Lard Sr. married Elizabeth “Betsy” Shons in Davidson County, Tennessee. James and Betsy had a son, Nathaniel Washington in Bedford County, Tennessee in 1816. Another son, Richard, was born in Williamson County, Tennessee in 1825 and ten years later in 1835, James Swan Jr. was born in Hardin County, Tennessee.

James Swan Lard Sr. was born in 1789, the son of Nathaniel Swan Laird. Nathaniel is the immigrant ancestor of this line and he was born in 1755 in the Orkney Islands, Scotland. These islands are north of the far north east shore of Scotland. They are separated from the mainland by about six miles of seaway. The history of the islands goes back to ancient times and they were under Norwegian rule in the 8th and 9th centuries. The Vikings used the islands as a base of operations for their pirate raids into the Scottish mainland and Norway.

Sometime after 1755 Nathaniel Swan Laird came to America. I don’t yet know if he came alone as a young adult, or came as part of a family group with siblings and parents. He was, however, a patriot during the Revolutionary War. I don’t know where he would have landed, but he ended up in North Carolina and that is where is was married in Rowan County. He married Agnes Scott January 17, 1781, Since my Scott historical research only extends to Buncombe County, North Carolina where John Scott was born in 1800 I have no idea if Agnes Scott might be a part of my primary Scott line.

Charlie and Judi Lard Scott came to Oklahoma about 1900-ish and the last of their children were born here in 1902 and 1904. The rest of the Lard family remained in the vicinity of Lauderdale County/Hardin County along the Alabama/Tennessee state line but I’m sure many descendants have spread out to other areas since then.

There’s more to the story of the Lard/Laird family in the Orkney Island and here in America, but this will do for now. I’m writing this because I recently met a 6th cousin along this line.  He descends from Richard Lard, born in 1825, older brother of James Swan Lard Jr. Their father, James Swan Lard Sr., is our 4th great-grandfather. I wonder if he’s heard anything about James Sr being “mean.”

I’d love to hear from anyone out there who knows more about this line, these people and these events. My new-found cousin tells me Richard, his 3x great-grandfather fought for the Union in Tennessee for six months at the beginning of the Civil War. Then he deserted and later fought for the Confederates. Those are the kinds of stories that bring history alive for me.

Let me know if you have anything to add.

Jan

Nathaniel Swan Laird > James Swan Lard Sr. > James S, Lard Jr. > Judi Isabell Lard (Scott) > Avery Albert Scott > Lela Mae Scott (Rose) > mom > me.

 
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Posted by on June 29, 2014 in Scott

 

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John Scott from North Carolina

Lela Mae Scott was born 1911 in Wanette, Oklahoma. In 1928 she married Thomas Edwin “Ed” Rose and later she became my grandmother. We called her “grandma.” No cutesy nickname, just grandma or Aunt Lela to the nieces and nephews—but she also answered to “Aint Leler.”

But this story isn’t about her. It starts with her great grandpa, John Scott who was born in the Blue Ridge Mountains in the Southern Appalachians. Buncombe County to be exact. Buncombe County is in western North Carolina on land the Cherokee occupied until European settlers pushed them out at the end of the 1700s.

After the American Revolution the new country had no money but lots of land. Land was granted to Patriot veterans as payment for services rendered and western North Carolina, on the eastern edge of the mountains was doled out in these land grants. John Scott was born here in 1800 or 1801.

Some sources list Black Mountain, NC—on Interstate 40 just east of Asheville—as his place  of birth, but the town wasn’t incorporated until 1893, more than 90 years after John Scott was born. Regardless of where exactly he was born, the area of western North Carolina soon filled up and it wasn’t long before many headed “over the mountains to see what they could see.”

The Scotts, John and his siblings (more about them at another time), headed west across Tennessee with some settling in the area of Nashville, others settling further south in Tennessee, and our John Scott continuing south, probably along the route of the Natchez Trace, to Alabama. In the 1830 US Census he shows up in Lauderdale County, AL,  just across the Tennessee state line.

The Scotts probably weren’t traveling alone. Familiar names—Haynes and Lamb come to mind—show up in North Carolina and again in Alabama, frequently as Scott spouses.

So now I am on a quest to assemble, and then write, the story of John Scott. Fortunately I’ve recently connected with lots of Scott cousins on a facebook page, Descendants of Waterloo, Alabama Scott Family. A few cousins have done some very detailed family research so I have a pretty good starting point when I add that to the research my mom has done.

The Scotts have been quite fruitful, and have multiplied significantly in just a few generations. It doesn’t take long to multiply when many families had ten or eleven or a dozen kids, who then went on to have another ten or twelve or so.

So stay tuned.  I’ll post what I have on John Scott, his two wives—Mary Carson and Harriet Farrell—and his fifteen children soon. At this stage, everything should be scrutinized and if you descend from some of these people and know more about that line than I do I want to hear from you.

If you’re a Scott descendant follow me by email so I can get in touch with you and we can share family details off-line.

Thanks,

Jan

 
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Posted by on June 2, 2014 in Scott

 

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Reuben Belue—Another Patriot Found

I found a new cousin a few days ago. She read my post about John Wesley Belew and since she has Belue ancestors in her line she asked for more information and we’ve been untangling a little snarl in a branch of my tree.

Turns out we both descend from Renney Belue, Revolutionary War soldier, who lived in the area of Union, South Carolina. He’s my 6th great-grandfather. He was married to a woman named Ann who apparently left him during his illness at the end of his life. Here’s what he says about her in his will:

First I give and bequeath unto my wife Ann the sum of one dollar and whereas she has Eloped from me – and left me in my sickness and been gone some time and has formerly Trangressed in such like manner and has practised dealing Greatley to my loss and disadvantage & for other good causes me thereto moving. I do deny her being a wife to me and hereby debar her from any further claim to any part of my Estate as by Dower or Otherwise.

We don’t know if she was the mother of his children, or a second wife, but it appears she was not faithful to her husband. Renney wanted to be sure she didn’t receive any of his estate after his death.

Renney had nine children who are also named in his will.

…my Nine Children Namely Zachariah, Rubin, Susan, Renny, Sarah, Judith, Elizabeth, Jesse and William

In my previous post about John Wesley Belew I had Zachariah as next in line in my tree, but turns out my line descends from Reuben. It goes like this:

Renney Belue
Reuben Belue
Jacob Belue
William Pierce Belew
John Wesley Belew
Bessie Jane Belew m.Will Rose
Thomas Edwin Rose m. Lela Scott were my grandparents

I had Jacob Belue as son of Zachariah, and curiously I also had Jacob Belue as a son of Reuben. Previously I noticed that and while the birth dates were different, the date of death was the same. It wouldn’t be unusual to have cousins with the same name born about the same time, but dying on the same day—except in time of war—is unusual. I made a note to look into it when the answer fell into my lap this week.

Paul Belew, one of Zachariah’s descendants, has researched and written an extensive history on Renney Belew and his family. His book, Our Belew Line, lays it all out.

As for my line, I haven’t found everything laid out so neatly, but I’ll do my best to flesh out the family history and tell it here. Not in this post here and now, but eventually.

I’ve found out Reuben was a saddle maker while his brothers were farmers. Reuben also served—with his brother Zachariah—in Col.Brandon’s South Carolina Regiment during the Revolutionary War.

Jacob Belew, Reuben’s son, moved the family to Tennessee ending up in Carroll County. His son, William Pierce Belew was born in Lauderdale County, Alabama, just across the Tennessee state line but evidently lived most of his life in Tennessee. It was his son, John Wesley Belew, who would later move his family—including my great-grandmother Bessie Jane—west again to the newly opened Oklahoma Territory

Any comments or corrections?

Jan

 
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Posted by on May 25, 2014 in Rose

 

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Revolutionary Grandpas and Uncles

I’m hooked on Turn, the AMC show about America’s first spy ring. Sunday’s episode 5, Epiphany, takes place at Christmas in 1776 when Washington crossed the Delaware to avoid a confrontation with the Redcoats and set up the Battle of Trenton.

I’d come across Trenton and Monmouth County, New Jersey during my research so I set out to find out who might have been there during the revolution. It was an easy search.

My family has several immigrant ancestors who were part of the original settlers of New Amsterdam in 1624. My 8th great-grandfather Phillipe du Trieux, his wife and son, were part of that settlement. In 1645 his youngest son, Jacob du Trieux my 7th great-grandfather was born in New Amsterdam. His son Phillip—6x great grandfather—was born in Monmouth County, NJ in 1676. It was during this generation the name changed from the French spelling Du Trieux to Truex or Truax. The family would be in New Jersey until the Revolutionary War.

Larue Jacob Truex—5x great grandfather—was born there in 1705. He died in 1774 two years before the colonies declared independence. It would be his sons that participated in the Revolutionary War and were likely involved in the Battle of Trenton.

His sons included

  • 1) Benjamin, 1731–1801. His grave marker indicates he was Private in the Pennsylvania Bedford County Militia during the Revolutionary War.
  • 2) Samuel, 1740–1801, PFC Rush’s Co PA Militia, Revolutionary War
  • 3) Jacob, 1745–1807
  • 4) Obedia, 1745–1787
  • 5) John, 1749–1807
  • 6) Phillip, 1752–1822, a Revolutionary War Soldier
  • 7) Stillwell, 1752–1822, a Revolutionary War Soldier
  • 8) Joseph, 1758–1839, 4x great-grandfather

Joseph Truex, his youngest son, is my 4x great-grandfather. He was 18 years old in 1776. There were also two daughters, Elizabeth, 1733–1810; and Catherine 1746–1804.

NOTE: After I wrote this I decided to look for the grave sites of some of these Revolutionary soldiers. On Find-A-Grave Joseph, son of Larue, is said to be born in 1741 and to have died during the Revolutionary War in 1777. I’ll investigate more.

Elizabeth Truex married Jacob Wink and they are also my 5th great grandparents. Jacob, 1833–1806 was likely in the militia. Their oldest son, Jacob, 1756–1820, was 20 years old in 1776 and was probably also a participant either in the militia or the Continental Army. After two daughters their next son, Adam Wink, my 4x great-grandfather, was born in 1764 so he was only 12 years old at the start of the war and too young to fight.

NOTE:  According to information on Find-A-Grave Elizabeth was daughter of Samuel Truex and Sarah Stilwell. But that can’t be right because, according to that same entry, Samuel was born in 1743 ten years after Elizabeth was born in 1733.

Both lines descend to my grandmother Kathryn McKay Miller Hamilton, and then to my dad.

I have other revolutionary relatives in North Carolina and South Carolina, but I’ll save those stories for another day.

Any questions?

Jan

 
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Posted by on May 6, 2014 in McKay

 

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My Connection to America’s First Spies

I love a good spy story. And if you put it  in a historically accurate context, all the better. So I’m looking forward to the new AMC series Turn, which starts tonight. It’s tagged The story of America’s first spies.

When I saw the first promos a few months ago I had to find out if it was based on real events or if it was historical fiction. Turns out it’s based on real events, and The Culper Ring, as the group was called, had a part in winning the American Revolution. The spy ring was organized by Benjamin Tallmadge, who became George Washington’s chief intelligence officer.

The name Tallmadge sounded familiar so I did some exploring through my very rudimentary family history and turned up Thomas Talmadge Sr., possibly my 12th great-grandfather. He was born in England in 1595, and died in New Netherland (later renamed New York) in 1653.

My “research” was more like a quick glance, but it seems Benjamin Tallmadge, the revolutionary war spy, also descended from Thomas Talmadge Sr. Note the name Talmadge is spelled differently in different places at different times. Pretty tricky when looking for records about these guys.

Thomas Talmadge, Sr. brought his family from England to New Netherland maybe about 1633. Among his family members were sons Thomas Talmadge Jr., 1617-1691—possibly my 11th great-grandfather—and Robert Talmadge, 1622-1662, Benjamin Tallmadge’s 3rd great grandfather.

Cool, huh?

So it could be the story of America’s first spies is also the story of a long-lost cousin. Makes watching it all the more interesting.

As for my Talmadge immigrant line, it goes like this:

  • Thomas Talmadge Jr., 1617–1691 >
  • Nathaniel Talmadge, 1643–1716 >
  • John Talmadge, 1678–1764 >
  • Elizabeth Talmadge, 1703–1772 >
  • Elizabeth Hedges, 1731–1778 >
  • Robert T Crockett, 1755–1835 >
  • Jemima Crockett, 1763–1853 >
  • Elizabeth Bivens, 1803–1873 >
  • Maggie Cochran, 1838–1915 >
  • Mittie Bryant, 1864–1931 >
  • Will Rose—my great grandpa—1885–1972 >
  • Ed Rose, my grandpa, 1909–1985 >
  • my mom,
  • then me.

Here are links to previous posts with more about my Rose line, and about the Crockett connection.

Coincidentally, Turn, is based on Washington’s Spies: The Story of America’s First Spy Ring a book written by Alexander Rose. I wonder if he’s another long-lost cousin.

 
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Posted by on April 6, 2014 in Rose

 

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400 Years of Rose Family History

Hey Rose cousins! William Rose, Colonial Virginia, 1650. That’s where it all started.

I’m fleshing out the details, but here’s a rundown on our Rose pedigree, which started on 211 acres on the fork of Gray’s Creek across the James River from Jamestown.

Generation 1: William Rose was born about 1622 in England or Scotland. He married Anne, we don’t know her last name, and they came to Virginia about 1650.

Generation 2: William Rose was born about 1655 in the newly formed Surry County, Virginia. He married Lucy Corker Jordan, a widow with a young daughter.

Lucy takes us back a couple of decades. Her father was Captain William Corker and his father, John Corker was born in 1601. He arrived in Jamestown on the Warwick in 1621.

But back to the Roses.

Generation 3: John Rose was born about 1696 in Virginia, probably Surry County. He married Abigail Hicks in 1728.

Generation 4: William Rose (another one!) was born in 1729 in Surry County, Virginia.  He married Frances, last name unknown.

Generation 5: Samuel Rose is where we start to wander out of Virginia after over 100 years in the vicinity of the James River. Samuel Rose was born about 1755 in Virginia, his wife was Rhoda. When the revolution rolled around Samuel signed up as a patriot in Guilford County, NC. The Guilford County Court House was the site of a significant battle in 1781.

Generation 6: Francis Rose was born in 1775, I think in Virginia. He married Elizabeth “Betsey” Ford. She was born in North Carolina. Francis and Betsey lived in Buncombe County, NC and later they moved over the mountains to McMinn and Monroe Counties Tennessee.

Generation 7: William Rose was born in Buncombe County, NC in 1806. William was one of a passel of kids and he and his brothers would take their generation to the edge of the frontier as it continued to move west through the decades of the 19th Century. William married Elizabeth, last name unknown.

William and Elizabeth crossed over the state of Tennessee and started their family in Chilcot County, Arkansas on the Mississippi River.  After a few years of river living they moved catty-cornered across the state of Arkansas to Benton County in the northwest corner. There they lived near some of William’s brothers and then as Texas was about to become a state they made some trips to Texas, eventually moving there.

Generation 8: David Rose was born in Chilcot County, Arkansas in 1833. His younger siblings were born in Benton County, Arkansas, and he was 17 when his baby sister was born in 1847 in Van Zandt County Texas.  His dad, William Rose, was one of the founders of the county.

JohnHenryRose1

John Henry Rose, born 1860, Shelby County, Texas.

David married Mary Lucinda Wright and they started a family in the Owlet Green community of Van Zandt County. In 1860 John Henry Rose was born and in 1861 David and his younger brother James signed up with the Texas Militia to fight in the Civil War. James was married and had a son before he went off to war. He died in Mississippi in 1864.

Generation 9: John Henry Rose was born 1860 in Shelby County, TX. He married Sally Ida Lake “Mittie” Bryant, a southern belle from southern Tennessee. He brought his family to Oklahoma before statehood first to Chickasaw Territory near Ardmore. Unfortunately the area was full of outlaws and it wasn’t long before the family moved further north to Cleveland County to the community of Buckhorn, east and south of Lexington.

Generation 10: William “Will” Thomas Rose, my great grandpa was born in Cleburne, Johnson County Texas in 1885. He was probably about 20 when his family arrived in Cleveland County and in 1907, the year of Oklahoma statehood he married Bessie Jane Belew, newly arrived from Tennessee. Their first child was born in 1908, John Wesley “Wes” Rose, and in 1909 my grandpa, Thomas Edwin Rose was born. Sadly Bessie died two months later.

Bessie Jane Belew

Bessie Jane Belew Rose. Born in 1888 and died in 1909 of childbirth complications, two months after Ed was born.

Will and Wes moved home to live with his parents, and baby Ed was cared for by his Grandma and Grandpa Belew who lived close by. In 1910 Will married Lizzie Black. The family was reunited and soon joined by more kids.

Rose-Will & Lizzie Family

Will and Lizzy Rose, about 1919. The kids are: John Wesley, b. 1908 (center back); Ed, b. 1909 (far right); James Earldon, b. 1911 (center); the girls are Dorothy, b. 1913; and Wanda, b. 1916,

Generation 11: Thomas Edwin “Ed” Rose was born in Cleveland County in 1909. He married Lela Mae Scott in 1928. He operated heavy machinery and worked road construction much of his life. He and grandma also owned a couple of grocery stores when he was unable to do that. He managed to stay employed, although meagerly, during the Great Depression. He went to where the work was with a job in Illinois, and other jobs all over the state of Oklahoma. Ed and Lela had two kids: Darlene and Sonny. The family was very close to Ed’s brother Wes, and his wife Ruby who had no children. When World War II arrived Wes was drafted and sent to England to prepare for the Invasion in June 1943. Fortunately he didn’t cross with the first wave, but arrived in France with the last wave nearly two weeks later. He fought across France, was injured once and spent some time in a hospital then sent back to battle. In October 1943 he was lost behind enemy lines for three weeks. Letters to Europe were returned and the family got the word he was Missing in Action. He eventually turned up, promising to tell all about it when he got home.  That cold November of 1943 things were hot and heavy across France, Belgium and Germany and plans were underway for the Battle of the Bulge. Three days later Pvt. John Wesley Rose was Killed in Action.

Generation 12: Darlene Nevell Rose, b. 1932; and Sonny Wayne Rose, b. 1936.

Ed Rose  1940

The Ed Rose Family, 1940. Sonny, Darlene, Lela and Ed.

Generation 13: Then there’s us:  Janet, Jimmy and David Miller; Tina, Brent and Lori Rose.

Generation 14: How many kids do we have?

Generation 15: Underway, but incomplete: Jayce, Jett, Rylan, Bodin, Hadden, Owen, Mia, Riley and Avery.

So that’s it. Over 400 years of family history whittled down to about a thousand words.

There’s way more to tell about our early ancestors, they were tobacco farmers, plantation owners, Indian fighters, slave owners, patriot soldiers, frontiersmen, pioneers, and settlers. They helped establish new settlements in Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Arkansas, Texas and Oklahoma, always moving to a new area shortly after—and sometimes before—it was available for settlement.

So any comments?  What do you think of our ancestors? They seem like pretty gutsy people to me. Here’s hoping I can find the primary documentation to validate all this.

Jan

Here are links to some of my Rose research.

 

 
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Posted by on January 22, 2014 in Rose

 

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