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Happy Birthday to Me

My birthday, March 21,  was earlier this week so I thought I’d share my birthday party with you. That’s my little brother Jimmy with his fingers in his mouth. I got a doctor’s kit for my birthday and I remember he couldn’t keep his hands out of it.

My second cousin, Debbie Scott, is on the right, and Brenda, my friend, has her back to the camera.

Birthday Party on Americansaga.wordpress.com

That little kid-size card table and chairs is red and white. I got it for Christmas that year. I still have the table somewhere. By the way, there are four cupcakes with candles in front of me, and this picture was taken 60 years ago.

My straight hair was not the style, so those little pin curls are compliments of one of my annual permanents. I slept on bobby pins to get that look.

Anybody else out there sleep in bobby pins? Or maybe you remember Spoolies that came along a few years later. They were these little pink rubber spools that took the place of bobby pins. A strand of hair was wrapped around the stem and the top of it snapped over the hair to hold it in place.

Avery Albert Scott and Caldona Scott were known as Poppy and Mommy to Debbie and me. They were our great grandparents. My grandmother was Lela Scott Rose, and her baby brother, my Uncle Mac, was Debbie’s grandpa. Uncle Mac’s real name was Raymond Rayford Scott.

I think the “Mac” nickname was because he liked to sing Old MacDonald Had a Farm, although I don’t remember where I saw that.

What about your early birthday parties? Do you have memories of gifts or guests?

 

 

 
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Posted by on March 23, 2017 in Rememberies, Scott

 

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Mid-Century Style

No matter what’s going on in my life, when February 16 pops up on my computer screen or date book I think of  Grandma and Grandpa. It’s their birthday today. Grandma would be 104 and grandpa would be 106. I’m talking about  Thomas Edwin “Ed” Rose  and Lela Mae Scott Rose.

Ed and Lela Rose and Me

This was Easter Sunday and I was just a few weeks past my first  birthday. Grandma was 43 and Grandpa was 45.

I love grandpa’s double-breasted suit. According to mom he was quite the dandy. As a construction worker he wore dungarees, similar to, but not quite jeans, and  chambray or flannel work shirts; but on Sundays he was always in a suit and tie. I never thought of President Eisenhower as a trendsetter, but here in the midst of the “Eisenhower Years” that military-style jacket Grandma is wearing has to be influenced by the General. There’s something very practical about the waistband at the bottom of the jacket. In a military uniform it would keep the tail of your jacket out of the way of your sidearm. The matching shirt cuffs tie the look together. On the battlefield the flapped pockets protected military orders and maps, but here thy add an element of style. The jacket looks perfect with  the slim a-line skirt. High-heeled pumps would look out of place with this suit, so grandma completes the look with fashionably updated oxfords.

And then there’s me, with my cute little dress coat over my Easter dress.

So Happy Birthday to my Grandma and Grandpa!

 
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Posted by on February 16, 2015 in Rose, Scott

 

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Two Working Oxen

In 1860 John Scott–my 4x great grandpa–farmed 90 acres and owned another 300 acres of unimproved land along Bumpass Creek in Lauderdale County, Alabama. His farm was worth $1,600. He owned another $200 worth of farm equipment.  He owned 6 horses, 4 “asses and mules”; 5 “milch cows”; 2 working oxen; 20 other cattle; 15 sheep; and 35 swine. The livestock was valued at $1750 on Schedule 4—Productions of Agriculture in the Western Division of Lauderdale County, Alabama.

Scott-etc-1866-nonPopSchedule copy

The previous year his farm produced 45 bushels of wheat; 1000 bushels of Indian corn; 35 pounds of wool; 16 bushels of Irish potatoes; 30 bushels of sweet potatoes; 50 pounds of butter; 4 tons of hay; and 70 gallons of molasses. The value of his homemade manufacturing was $10 and the value of his slaughtered animals was $170.

John at age 59, had a personal estate valued at $4500 in addition to the $1,600 real estate. His wife Harriet had a personal estate of $700 with $600 of real estate. She and John had four children. Mary Ann was the first, born in 1845 and she died at the age of five. The other children were listed on the 1860 census: Thomas, age 12; Camille, age 9 and Robert, age 5.

Scotts on 1860 census

1860 census includes John Scott Jr, his wife and kids; Frank, my 3x great grandpa, Jeremiah Franklin with his wife and son; Harriet Scott and five of her children; her son George Thompson and his family; James Scott who was incorrectly identified as “Thompson” with the ditto marks the census taker continued down the page. The last entry is John Scott Sr., also incorrectly identified as Thompson.

 

Harriet Thompson Scott, John’s second wife, had an 80-acre farm of her own which she inherited from her first husband. Her farm was worth $600 with $100 worth of farm equipment. She had 3 horses, 1 milk cow, 2 oxen, 5 other cattle, 15 sheep, and 20 swine with a total value of $400. Her farm produced 12 bushels of wheat, 475 bushels of Indian corn, 35 pounds of wool, 25 bushels of Irish potatoes, 50 pounds of butter, one ton of hay, $25 worth of homemade goods, and slaughtered livestock valued at $135.

1860 Ag Census

This detail lists sons John Jr. and  Frank (Jeremiah Franklin); Harriet, his second wife; son James; John Scott Sr., and another son, William Scott. Next is John Lamb Sr. and his son John Lamb Jr.; then another Scott son, Poindexter, who married a daughter of John Lamb; Spencer Lard or Lord, who has no farm, but $15 in farm equipment. I haven’t placed him yet, but it seems he might live on the farm of one of the Scotts. Next is Weatherly Haines, and William Scott, a brother of John Scott Sr.

Further down the page I found John’s sister, Isabella Scott Lambert. Her husband Abner, has died leaving her the farm.

I included the columns for Improved acres, Unimproved acres, Value of farm, Value of farm Implements.

 

Isabella Scott Lambert farm

The page included other familiar names, Black and a couple of Webbs..

John’s youngest son Rufus, 22, was a newlywed. He and his wife Elizabeth, 18, were listed in the same household with his father.

John’s youngest daughter, Elizabeth married John W. Haines (Weatherly). When she died he married her sister Catherine Tennessee, Tennie, Scott.

John’s first wife was probably Mary Carson and Jobe Carson is also listed further down the page. At 40-years-old he might be a nephew if there’s any connection at all.

I know there are other relatives I’ll find when I take time to look at more pages of this census. I’m fascinated with the details of their lives on the brink of the Civil War.

Jan

 
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Posted by on December 30, 2014 in Scott

 

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What’s Your Name?

So yesterday I posted a bit about the Lard/Laird branch of my family tree and coincidentally today the Genealogy Tip of the Day was about last names.  How fixed are they?  Turns out not very.

In certain regions of Europe last names changed from one generation to another or were tied to the property on which an ancestor lived…

Learn about your ancestor’s country of origin and determine what the common practices were in that region…

Even before I started researching my family tree I’d heard names sometimes changed from the old country to the new world. Different languages, different accents, unknown spellings all played a part in the names new Americans acquired upon arrival. The name Vito Corleone is recognized as the main character in the Godfather. However, in the Godfather II it’s a young Vito Andolini who arrives at Ellis Island from Corleone, Sicily. As the boy is registered to enter the United States there are language difficulties and Vito is given the last name Corleone, which is actually the name of his home town.

However, It also seems to have happened to our names as we moved from state to territory to new frontier areas as we settled the country. My research into my great-grandmother Bessie Jane Belew Rose turns up relatives and ancestors named Belue, Beleu, Ballew and even Ballou, as in Cat Ballou. Remember that movie with Lee Marvin playing the drunkest gunfighter in the west? Cat—as in Catherine—Ballou hires him to protect the family ranch and then avenge her father’s death. It was a comedy by the way, made in 1965. But back to our story… The name is pronounced “blue” like the color, and that’s how it’s spelled in some families along with a very French version of Ballieux, or something like that.

Turns out I have a branch of Blues, like the color, on a different part of my tree. And a great great grandmother, Catherine Blue—I wonder if she was called Cat. These Blues came from Scotland by way of Nova Scotia and as far as I can tell the name was always spelled Blue. This is the same family that begat Ronald Reagan and makes the former president one of our distant cousins on my Dad’s side.

Speaking of French—back to the Ballieux spelling—Phillippe Du Trieux arrived in New Amsterdam in 1624 with the first immigrants on the ship the New Netherland to settle on Manhattan Island. In a few generations Philippe, became Phillip, and du Trieux became Truax. One of the du Trieux boys married Sarah la Roux, They named a son Larue, and his last name became Truex, with an “e” and then later the name settled on the spelling of Truax, with an “a”. About the same time someone named VanderVinck arrived in the area and over a couple of generations his name evolved to become Wink, as in Sansom Wink, my great great grandfather.

Other family names that have evolved over the years are Beavins, Bevins or Bivens, and maybe before that it was originally ap Evans, which means “of Evan”, as in “son of Evan” in Ireland and Wales.

Then there were different spellings, Talmadge became Talmage, as in America’s first spies. Stillwell, was spelled Stilwell sometimes. In looking for information about my great great grandmother Nancy Qualls, I can’t overlook Quarles and Quails.

Some of my family names have seemed fixed through the years: Rose, Miller, McKay, Scott… although Scott was written Schott in a marriage record once, Rose can turn up as Ross in some families; Miller can be Millar; McKay might be McKee… It’s good to keep these things in mind when looking for specific documents that don’t seem to exist.

How about your family names?  What differences have turned up in your research?

Jan

Here’s how I’m related to some of these people.

Me > Dad > Kathryn McKay, she was called “Kat” > Olive Wink > Sansom Wink > Jacob Adam Wink > Adam Wink > Jacob Wink, Esq. b. 1733, Bedford, PA > Sebastian Wink b. 1705 in Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands, immigrated and returned to die in France > Isaac VanDerVinck

Me > Dad > Kathryn McKay > Olive Wink > Sansom Wink > Jacob Adam Wink > Adam Wink > Jacob Wink, Esq. who married Elizabeth Truax > Larue Jacob Truex > Phillip Truex > Jacob Du Trieux > Philippe Du Trieux > Philippe DuTrieux, b. 1586, Roubaix, Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, arrived New Amsterdam, 1624.

Me > Dad > Kathryn McKay > Donald Graham McKay > Robert McKay who married Catherine Blue > Donald Daniel Blue (great great grandfather of Ronald Reagan) > Donald Neil Blue b. 1799 in Kilcalmonell, County, Argylshire Highlands of Scotland

 
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Posted by on July 1, 2014 in McKay, Miller, Rose, Scott

 

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Ships Passing Under a Full Moon on a Cloudless Night

Today I crossed paths with a woman named whose last name was Scott.

I mentioned my grandmother’s maiden name was Scott and in working on my family tree I’ve found boatloads—or I guess wagon loads would be a more apt description—of Scotts who came to Oklahoma way back when. Many more Scotts than I ever met or knew existed here in Oklahoma. I thought she might offer a bit of information about her family and we might compare a note or two.

Nope.

My words just laid there like a lazy dog napping on the porch on a steamy summer afternoon.

I thought it was curious that she didn’t have at least a comment about it. I mean, isn’t everyone interested in their family history?

I guess not.

But to be fair, it was likely her married name, so she may not know anything about her husband’s family. Maybe he died and she doesn’t know any of his kin. Or maybe she’s divorced and it was really ugly and she doesn’t want anything to do with his folks.

Fortunately it was fleeting so it wasn’t too awkward. Kind of like ships that pass in the night when there’s a full moon. We saw each other had a brief conversation, but then it was over.

That’s all.

Jan

PS ~ My grandmother is Lela Mae Scott Rose; daughter of Avery Albert Scott, son of William Charlie Scott, son of Jeremiah Franklin Scott, son of John Scott.

 
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Posted by on June 21, 2014 in Random Observations, Scott

 

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Fifteen Kids!

Sometime before 1823 John Scott of Buncombe County, North Carolina established his home in Lauderdale County, Alabama just a few miles south of the Tennessee state line. I have that he was born August 25, 1800, but I don’t know where that date came from so speak up if you have better information.

He’s the ancestor that donated the land for the Bumpass Creek Baptist Church I wrote about a few posts back.

In 1823 he married Mary Elizabeth Carson in Lauderdale County. She was born in 1807 in North Carolina. John was 23 years old, and Mary was 16. I wonder if John knew Mary back in North Carolina and he was waiting for her to grow up so he could marry her. On the other hand, the county was newly opened to settlers and many of them came from the Carolinas so when he was ready to settle down their paths crossed and they set up housekeeping together.

Their first child, a son, was born in Lauderdale County in 1825. They named him William Moore Scott. It’s one of the few unique names in the family tree. It’s hard to know where the name came from, but a popular naming custom was to name sons after military leaders, and more specifically after the captain of a father or grandfather’s regiment. Maybe we’ll find out more about the Scott family during the American Revolution one of these days and see if something shakes loose along this line of thinking.

It was also popular to name sons after presidents and the Scotts have done this through the years. John and Mary picked the name James Monroe Scott for their second child born in 1826.

Next they had a daughter, Charlott Matilda who was born in 1827 and unfortunately died three years later. We don’t know if she suffered ill-health or was the victim of an accident, something that was all too common in new settlements.

Another girl arrived a year later, Catherine Tennessee “Tennie” Scott was born in 1828, and in 1830 Caroline Malinda Scott arrived. Saleta Jane Scott,  born in 1831—she would die at age 15—was the fourth in a run of daughters.

In 1833 John Madison Scott was born and Jeremiah Franklin “Frank” was born in 1834. Poindexter D. Scott—another easy-to-track name—was born in 1836 and a year later, in 1837, another son, Rufus Carmack Scott was born. After having ten kids in 12 years, Mary was just 30 years old. It was four years before her last child, Elizabeth was born in 1841.

Mary Carson Scott died in 1842 leaving John with ten kids ages 1 to 16. The older boys, at 15 and 16 were obviously helping farm the land. Keeping house and tending to the baby probably fell to 13-year-old Tennie and her sisters, ages 11 and 10.

It was a couple of years before a new mom joined the family. John married Harriet Frances Ferrell June 9, 1844. She was born in South Carolina in 1810. She was 34 years old. Her first husband, Samuel Jack Thompson, died about 1843. I don’t have her children on my family tree, but there are Thompson family trees that say there were eight Thompson children ages 1–16 who joined the Scott family, making a blended family of 20. And then they had four more kids! Talk about yours, mine, and ours!

Mary Ann Scott, the first of John and Harriet’s children, was born in 1845 and she died at age five in 1850. In 1848, Thomas Jefferson Scott (another presidential name) was born. Camilie Alabama Scott was born in 1850, and the baby of the family, Robert Neal Scott, was born in 1854.

John Scott received a land grant for the Bumpass Creek farm in 1832. He shows up in the US Census of 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1880. In 1866 he’s listed on the Alabama State Census listed along with the families of Frank Scott (Jeremiah Franklin), John Scott (John Madison?), Billy Scott (William Moore?), Betsy Scott (a widowed spouse?), and James Scott (James Monroe?).

Here are the names and dates as I have them. Please don’t take them as gospel until I can add records to substantiate them. And If you have different information, I’m all ears.

Generation 1

JOHN1 SCOTT was born August 25, 1800 in Buncombe County, North Carolina, and died March 27, 1884 in Lauderdale County, Alabama.  In 1823 in Lauderdale Co., AL he married 1) MARY ELIZABETH CARSON, b 1807, North Carolina; d. 1842 in Waterloo, Lauderdale Co., AL. June 9, 1844 in Lauderdale Co., Alabama John married 2) HARRIET FRANCES FERRELL Thompson b. Nov. 4, 1810, South Carolina; d. Dec. 8, 1880, Lauderdale Co., AL.

Children of JOHN SCOTT and MARY ELIZABETH CARSON were all born and died in Lauderdale Co., Alabama with two exceptions as indicated.

  1. WILLIAM MOORE SCOTT, b. February 24, 1825; d. March 24, 1866.
  2. JAMES MONROE SCOTT, b. April 22, 1826; d. 1884.
  3. CHARLOTT MATILDA SCOTT, b. 1827, d. 1830. Died at age 3
  4. CATHERINE TENNESSEE “TENNIE” SCOTT, b. 1828, d. 1902.
  5. CAROLINE MALINDA SCOTT, b. 1830, d. 1863.
  6. SALETA JANE SCOTT, b. 1831, d. 1847. Died at age 15
  7. JOHN MADISON SCOTT, b. 1833.
  8. JEREMIAH FRANKLIN2 “FRANK” SCOTT, b. Sept. 5, 1834; d. Nov. 11, 1884.
  9. POINDEXTER D. SCOTT, b.  Sept. 2, 1836; d. May 3, 1911.
  10. RUFUS CARMACK SCOTT, b. Nov. 27, 1837; d. Aug. 4, 1907.
  11. ELIZABETH W SCOTT, b. Sept. 9, 1841; d. Aug. 2, 1872.

Children of JOHN SCOTT and HARRIET FRANCES FERRELL Thompson are:

  1. MARY ANN SCOTT, b. March 3, 1845; d. 1850. Died at age 5.
  2. THOMAS JEFFERSON SCOTT, b. April 30, 1848; d. April 18, 1933, Barton, MO.
  3. CAMILIE ALABAMA SCOTT, b. June 26, 1850; d. May 20, 1932.
  4. ROBERT NEAL SCOTT, b. Oct. 4, 1854; d. Jan. 17, 1909, Hardin Co., TN

Whew! There’s so much more to say about the folks listed on this page, but we’ll tackle this a little at a time. If you’re descended from one of these Scotts I want to hear from you.

Stay tuned!

Jan

4x great-granddaughter of John Scott > Jeremiah Franklin Scott > William Charlie Scott > Avery Albert Scott > Lela Mae Scott Rose > Darlene Rose Miller > Jan Miller Stratton

 

 
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Posted by on June 2, 2014 in Scott

 

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Sharing Direct Line Ancestors ~ a Cheat Sheet

It’s one thing to track down your ancestors and totally another to figure out how to share it with friends and family. Another trick is trying to remember which line some of your new finds go with. Especially as you get deep into maternal lines where the surname may only appear once on your tree. So I created a form to help me keep things straight for 16 generations all on one page. I call it my Direct Line Worksheet.

DL-Rose-Sample

How do ya like them apples?

This sample is pretty easy to follow, it’s my Rose line which goes from my mom back to Jamestown. The left side of the page is for Direct Line ancestors—in this case all Roses—while the right side is for the spouses.

The far left column identifies each generation from you. There are two rows for each ancestor to allow room for basic details. There are cells for places and dates of birth, death and marriage. Two rows for each entry provide room for you to add a nickname or military title for your relative.

This is meant to be a cheat sheet not a complete picture of your family line. I provided space at the bottom for notes that don’t fit into the space allowed. Place names can be especially long so there’s room in the footnote to spell out parish, city, county, state and country if you want.

To fill this out, I start with me, mom and dad, grandparents and other people and details I know from memory. Then I check my notes and type in more details that are handy. When I reach a dead-end I print what I have so far. I can take this page and look for additional information and I’ll make a note of footnotes I want to include. My footnotes have tended to start at the bottom and go up. I don’t think it matters as long as I keep them in order. And I’ve used the same number more than once when the same information applies.

When you finish, you can fill out the summary at the top. Start, is the place to put the earliest year and that location. Names is where you put the sequence of Direct Line surnames.  On this page, Rose is the only name listed. The migration line is for the locations where your family was born, married and died. I just list each place once.

Here’s what the blank form looks like.

DirectLine-Blank-PDFRight click on the image to download a scruffy copy you can print for making notes on.

I have at least one family line that will need more space. I’ll see if I can figure out which one it is and make a two-sided worksheet for longer family lines. In the meantime, take a look at this and see what you think.

Here’s another sample. This one is my Scott family line. DL-Scott-1803I’m open to suggestions. I don’t have a place to provide this for free, but I can put it on Etsy for a couple of bucks. (It will cost a little bit to list it.) You’ll be able to download a clean pdf image and the excel spreadsheet that you can fill in on your computer.

Maybe no one needs this but me, but I’ve sure filled in a lot of them the past few days. I’m going to keep a print copy in each family file folder, and a digital copy in each family folder on my computer. I’ll punch holes in a set and keep them alphabetized in a notebook on my desk as a quick reference. I’ll make a set for my mom (who isn’t online). A completed set would be a great addition to a baby book or gift for newlyweds!

Any suggestions, besides more lines for footnotes?

Jan

 
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Posted by on February 11, 2014 in Resources

 

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